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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:05 am 
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David Conwill wrote:
Well, I finally managed to get a fourth large-cap (Maverick) wheel for my Falcon. I had to buy some large caps to go with them, and decided that I liked the look of the 1952 to 1954 Ford center cap the best:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v485/ ... 6a1791.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v485/ ... 11ec71.jpg

What do you think?

-Dave

Not bad at all!

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1961 Tudor Deluxe, 302, C-4, disc brakes, '65 suspension
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:17 am 
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Dave,

That is one of the choices a friend of mine used. He also used beauty rings. He changed the dogdishes and beauty rings several times a year. Sometimes with full wheelcovers. So there are many choices. I like the 59 cap myself that has no font in it.

Terry L. Rahn

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 1:16 pm 
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Terry L. Rahn wrote:
Dave,

That is one of the choices a friend of mine used. He also used beauty rings. He changed the dogdishes and beauty rings several times a year. Sometimes with full wheelcovers. So there are many choices. I like the 59 cap myself that has no font in it.

Terry L. Rahn


The ‘57 to ‘59 cap was my second choice, with the ‘55 to ‘56 cap being in third place. The early ‘60s caps were all in contention, but they’re pretty hard to find, as it seems most buyers were into full wheelcovers by then, and the guys with 401-horse 390 Galaxies want what few dog-dish caps there are around.

I thought the ‘52 cap goes with the lines of the roundbody pretty well. In fact, a lot of the roundbody seems nicely compared to the ‘52 to ‘54 cars - my favorite post-war Fords. In some ways, the ‘52 cap reminds me of the ‘60-‘63 Falcon “bottle” cap, which is what I’d have likely sought out if I’d found a fourth small-cap wheel (although it would have been a while, as my car came with a decent set of ‘64 Falcon caps).

-Dave

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 9:18 am 
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Last week I picked up the Scarebird disc brake brackets for putting Nissan rotors and Cavalier calipers on my 4-lug hubs. I’m not in a huge rush to do this, but I wanted to have the parts on hand. Probably when/if I next need brake service, I’ll do the swap.

Depressingly, I’ve been thinking about farming out the work. Seems like with family, work, and old house projects, I just don’t have the time or energy to fit in the car stuff at the moment.

The guys who did the new exhaust on my Falcon are also a Raybestos dealer, so maybe they’ll be up for a little custom brake work.

Oh, I ought to mention that the first week in August, I over revved the engine and have picked up an awful clatter in the engine. It seems to be coming from the mechanical fuel pump. I need to try swapping out the pump to see if it goes away.

-Dave

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 01, 2010 1:35 pm 
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Right now on Craigslist near me there are a 200 and a 250 for sale. I wish I had a bit of extra time and money.

-Dave

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 2:16 pm 
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I took an “afro” disc to some of the rust bubbles and flakey paint last night. I turned up less bondo than I feared (although still more than I wanted).

I know the right answer is to cut out rusty parts and then some, and weld in a patch, but that’s just not in the cards right now. For the time being, I’ve ground away as much rust as I could and used Rustoleum’s rusty metal encapsulator. I’ll follow that up with a couple coats of primer.

I’ve been thinking about eventually media blasting the rust and filling holes with mar glass. I wish the Cambridge blue was easier to match with an off-the-shelf paint.

-Dave

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 5:50 pm 
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Dave,

The local paint supply store can mix a rattle can of the color needed. I have a paint chip sheet I take in and they match it from that. The only negative to having a rattle can made up, is that there cannot be any hardner. So it takes a bit longer to cure and will be "soft". There is no hiding or covering up rust. Unless it is removed, it will creep farther as time passes. I made temp patches and welded them on our 61 Tudor Deluxe last spring. That should keep the moisture at bay and retard rust issues on ours. Eventually, I will have to replace the lower quarters and wheel arches in the future, but what I have done is good for a long term temp repair.

Terry L. Rahn

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 7:24 am 
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Terry L. Rahn wrote:
what I have done is good for a long term temp repair.


Terry,

Thanks for the response.

I know your method is correct and the best, and I’d vastly prefer to do it that way, but I can’t weld and I can’t fabricate. Eventually, I’ll have proper patching done, but for right now my concern is to slow the decay as much as possible.

I would love to crank up my dad’s old welder and start cutting out rusty metal, but house stuff is my Number One concern at the moment. I think I’m going to buy a 4WD for this winter, which will at least give me some peace of mind.

-Dave

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 9:47 am 
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David,

If you have pop rivets, you don't need a welder. I riveted patches in place before I started welding them in. I still use countersunk rivets on the long horizontal seams. I have not ever cut out the metal with heat. I use mechanical means. I used the Aviation shears years ago, but as I get older, I am favoring my air hammer with the panel cutter. The cutoff wheel works well also, and that can be a electric angle grinder or die grinder if no air is available.

Fabricating patch panels is nothing more then making a template, transfer the pattern onto 18 gage sheetmetal, and hand forming it to fit the area to be patched. My Dad showed me back in the early 60's and I carried it farther as time passed. All I normally use, are a bench vice, a couple lengths of angle iron for a brake for sharp bends, round stock for some curves, and some various channel stock patterns for ridges. The ballpeen hamer does most of the rough work, but I do have body hammers/dollies for other work when needed.

The need to winterize is upon us. So that has to take priority. There might still be time to repair the rust patches before they get too far along. A 4x4 is a plus in winter. My favorite for 28 years was my E250 Quadravan 4x4 by Pathfinder I bought new in 78. Nothing could stop it with sensible driving on and off road. The rust got too far ahead me too quickly at the end, so I pulled the 460/C6 and sold the rolling chassis. I have had nothing that had as little maintenance. The only part that failed on the engine was a water pump at over 200k miles. When I worked at a Ford reman, I rebuilt a starter and alternator that were getting noisy but still worked fine. there is over 300k miles on the engine, and I drove it up to the shed and pulled the engine and tranny when the rolling chassis was sold.

Anyway, you can take time to repair the rust as you mentioned, or with about the same time, repair it using patches over removed rusted sections. It just depends on lifes priorities and the weather now.

Terry L. Rahn

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:02 am 
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Thanks very much for the response and the perspective, Terry. With my dad gone, I’m kind of lost for a mentor, and don’t always see my options.

I think I’m going to explore the riveted-patch idea. I’ve seen 1930s cars repaired that way, but didn’t really think of it for my ‘60s car.

That being said, I really want to get a winter beater soon, as I can’t stand the thought of putting my Falcon through another Michigan winter. I have been thinking S10 (I’ve owned several of that platform, and really like them) or Ranger pickup (every car guy needs a hauler), but a ‘90 Grand Marquis just popped up that has me sorely tempted...

-Dave

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:31 am 
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David,

My Dad was my mentor for many details in life. He died in 92 and I missed the advice and conversations we often had. For bodywork, I remembered quite a bit, but have gone to bodymen for advice. I have 3 friends now that have owned body shops for quite some time, and have the advice of a couple from TFFN. That has given me the current knowledge of tecniques and materials that I can base a judgement for a repair on. Regardless of any income I have had, the last thought is to have someone else repair my vehicles. My first thought is how I am going to repair them. I dislike paying someone to do something I can do. I might lack experience, but I have the necessary skills of head and hands. I believe you can also do the rust repair on your Falcon. You just have to tell yourself that you can is all it is.

I do like pickups for winter use, even 4x4's. I have 2 wheel drive full sized vans that get through snow better then 4x4 pickups. The Grand Marquis I had, was not very good in heavy snow. The ideal winter vehicle was my 78 Quardavan. I went through 28 winters with it and deep as 5' drifts with no problems. Some of the Jeep products like the Cherokee or Grand Cherokee are pretty good. The Durango looks good also. The full size Bronco was a good vehicle. The Explorer is not a heavy duty strong vehicle, but is a capable winter vehicle with the right tire. The first gen seems better then the second gen. I like a solid rear axle for 4x4 and driving in mud and snow we have here. The 92 Explorer one of my son's bought was only $600 and has been pretty good since he bought it. It feels a litle on the light side in heavy snow, but goes through without issues. So there are a few to choose from that are good for winter.

Terry L. Rahn

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 11:53 am 
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Why is Falcon weatherstripping so dang hard to figure out? Nobody’s catalogue descriptions make any sense, and I’m certain I’m going to end up ordering something I don’t need.

I want my vent windows to stop leaking, my doors to stop being drafty, and my windows to stop rattling. Any ideas what that takes?

When that’s done, we’ll start on sealing up the firewall...

-Dave

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:52 pm 
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David Conwill wrote:
I want my vent windows to stop leaking, my doors to stop being drafty, and my windows to stop rattling. Any ideas what that takes?

-Dave

For the vent windows, it's a 2 piece arrangement; one in a v-shape to go around the front of the window and a straight piece along the back edge.

For the doors, you want to order door weatherstripping for your year (61) and for either 2 door or 4 door whichever is yours.

For the windows, you probably need the channel runs which again is multiple pieces. You can get it with or without the stainless steel trim beading. I prefer with on mine as that's how my Deluxe 61 came and it looks better.

Others here can give you more details but those are the basics.

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1961 Tudor Deluxe, 302, C-4, disc brakes, '65 suspension
1965 Fordor Futura, 289, C-4
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 1:50 pm 
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David

If you have a 2 door I have most of what you need - a pair of door seals and the top and back channel liners for the windows (both door and quarter window), both the angle seals and back edge seals (no rivets) for the vent windows, and the metal division bar that runs down the back of the vent window frame that I'll sell for a good price. I was working on a sedan and then discovered hard tops so I don't need them. For the belt line fuzzies try Classic Auto Parts - www.classicautoparts.com . They reportedly have thicker fuzzies that seal better. If you plan on doing the whole car at some point I think you'd be better off price wise buying a complete kit and storing the rest until needed.

Ken

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The day you stop learning is the day you start getting left behind.
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:59 am 
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It's been a while. I've picked up an un-cracked windshield, a period-looking tachometer, and a '65 Mustang 200 since I last posted.

Still driving and enjoying the car on a regular basis. I get lots of compliments and often have it pointed out to me that my car is older than me.

-Dave

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