It is currently Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:18 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 135 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 11:53 am 
Offline
O6-16
O6-16
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2003 10:21 pm
Posts: 22956
Location: Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 53965
Dave,

So the fan diameter was the problem then. I can see that as an issue.

Terry L. Rahn

_________________
61 Fordor Deluxe Wagon RIP 69-95
61 2 Dr Wagon
61 Futura 76-17 RIP
http://members.fotki.com/tlr41552/about/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 11:57 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
Right, my buddy thought the larger diameter would help with his overheating problems, but it was a bit too big.

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 9:05 pm 
Offline
O3-13
O3-13
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2009 10:05 am
Posts: 4568
Location: Atlanta, GA
Although it's been quite a few years ago, and I was young and dumb...(I'm older now) I'm pretty sure my 63 Falcon Club Wagon was built with a 170 and a nine inch rear end. It did have a 200 when I built the engine in high school auto shop, (I figured that out when I tried to put the 170 rings on the pistons, and ended up with about a half inch of ring gap! :roll: )

I DO know the 3 speed manual tranny and rear end never gave a problem with the built 200, but U-joints wouldn't hold up to a hard upshift! I ALWAYS had 2 u-joints in the glove box, and the wrenches and hammer to install them... I could replace u-joints on the side of the road quicker than I could find the drive shaft sometimes!

Rotor

_________________
The more I fix, the more I see needs to be fixed.

Image
Buttercup, 64 Falcon Futura
260 V-8
Ford-O-Matic
Mostly original, including the dents.
FCA Member #15016


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:42 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
I was contemplating selling my Futura in favor of a Comet wagon. After an extended conversation with my wife, it looks like we're going to keep the Futura and look for a third (technically fourth, if you count the Camaro) car to use as a driver - hopefully that will be some kind of station wagon, as I really like their hauling ability. For most tasks, I think they're even superior to a pickup, as you can load through the rear doors.

Having something like an '80s Country Squire around will allow me to take the Futura down for extended periods and do the restoration right; and give me a vehicle that will haul kids, parts, and home improvement supplies with ease. Not to mention, it's cooler than our Yukon!

This will also allow me to more purely pursue my goal of building the Futura as a 1961 FoMoCo Compact Executive Car (think BMW 3 Series).

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 11:36 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
Tiny update: My radio finally came back from the restorer (I thought I'd lost it - turns out he was just incredibly backlogged and all of my e-mails were going into his spam folder). He added an AUX jack and restored it, so now I can listen to AM and plug my iPhod in when there's nothing on the radio (iPhod signal will overcome the AM input). Turns out that in addition to having pushbuttons, the radio also has a front/rear fader, so I can wire in a package shelf speaker if I want. That makes buying a pair of 5x7s more sensible now.

Interestingly, unlike the '60 Motorola radio I bought to replace this one, the pushbutton Stromberg-Carlsson does not say FORD under the dial, instead it has a pattern of evenly-spaced squares. I suspect it may have started out in a '62 Comet.

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 5:13 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
I answered an ad from Craigslist selling the flywheel, head, and exhaust manifold from a 144. I didn't want the head, and he wouldn't sell the exhaust manifold separately, but what I wanted and got was the flywheel. Another step toward the overdrive becoming reality!

Somehow I ended up with two frozen-up Autolite 1100s in the deal too. That means I have three now. Not sure what I'll do with those, as I'd been thinking about going with an Autolite 2100 or a Weber 32/36.

I've also been shopping around for rust repair. Very depressing.

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:10 am 
Offline
O6-16
O6-16
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2003 10:21 pm
Posts: 22956
Location: Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 53965
Dave,

About 25 years ago or so, I had a vehicle that needed rust repair. The shops around here did not want to tackle it and gave outrageous estimates. So I decided to get the panels myself and install them. Then had a shop finish the bodywork afterwards. I was not a newby to auto body repair, since my Dad was a bodyman for 28 years. At the time I just did not have the tools to work with. I made the decision to do my own rust repair after that, and got the minimum tools to do the job. Quite a few rust repairs have been done in the gravel driveway, including the panel painting since then. Long term work has been done in a 100 year old machine shed.

Terry L. Rahn

_________________
61 Fordor Deluxe Wagon RIP 69-95
61 2 Dr Wagon
61 Futura 76-17 RIP
http://members.fotki.com/tlr41552/about/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:33 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
That they did not want to do the work was absolutely the feeling I got. Nice guys, but they made it clear that they were two men short and had plenty of insurance work to deal with, so just installing and blending in patch panels was not something that really got them excited. Had I wanted a full makeover (all bumps and dents smoothed, full repaint, etc.), I think the answer would have been different, but in addition to not being able to bankroll such a project, I really do not desire a car that is too nice to drive.

Unfortunately, every time I start to look into doing the repairs myself, most of the feedback I get points me back at professionals. It's not something I see myself doing much of; I don't have room to build a fleet. Plus, everyone says not to tackle your car until you've had plenty of practice on scrap materials - my neighbors and wife would go crazy if I started hauling home junk to practice bodywork on.

I discovered where the local "r-- rod" shop has set up their operation, however, and intend to go pay them a visit. I think they'll get what I'm after.

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:54 am 
Offline
O6-16
O6-16
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2003 10:21 pm
Posts: 22956
Location: Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 53965
Dave,

It is not intimidating, when you really look at it. Just study how the body was made is the basic start. Then it is a matter of cutting beyond the rust and fastening the patch panel. You can use rivets space 3/4" to 1" apart or weld to secure the panel. I use countersunk rivets on long horizontal seams. Then it is a matter of leveling the surface and painting. It is easiest on a round body to spread the filler over the entire insert and sand down from there to get a level surface. I never practiced on anything. My practice was the vehicle that needed the work. So far, I have not had to redo the patch I install, but I have had to redo the filler work. For many years, I used rattle can paint. Sometimes custom mix, other times a off the shelf match. If I do not like the paint finish, I just sand it off and start over. It really is not a difficult task, but does get better over time.

Terry L. Rahn

_________________
61 Fordor Deluxe Wagon RIP 69-95
61 2 Dr Wagon
61 Futura 76-17 RIP
http://members.fotki.com/tlr41552/about/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 9:08 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
What do you mean by insert, Terry? The patch panel?

I forgot about rivets, we've discusses them before, I think. How do you install/countersink them? Also, what do you use to cut out the rust? An angle grinder?

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 9:09 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
Maybe I should just ask what your basic kit of body-repair tools consisted of?

-Dave

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 12:00 pm 
Offline
O6-16
O6-16
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2003 10:21 pm
Posts: 22956
Location: Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 53965
David,

The insert is the center body contour. I usually have the seam in the middle of that part. I use what ever works for cutting metal. It varies by repair.

Basic body tools are the body hammer and dolly set, sanding block, air sanders such as the inline 16" straight and the jitterbug, air DA sander, electric orbital detail sander cheapy, to name a few. Cutting tools are the 4 1/2" angle grinder that is all purpose, air body shear, air nibbler, air 3" cutoff wheel, old electric panel shear my Dad had, and the panel ripper for the long barrel air hammer. I try to keep sand paper on hand in 40, 80, 120, 150, and 320 grit. I use the 4 1/2" flap disc from LeHigh Valley Abrasives ( http://www.lehighvalleyabrasives.com/se ... Categories ). I have been using the conical zirconia so far, but just got the ceramic to try on the weld grinding. I have some discarded 4" cup brushes from the shop I used to work at for cleaning, paint and rust removal. The common hand tools are also used. I do have several vice grip curved and straight jaw pliers, vice grip C type pliers, and the vice grip sheep metal pliers to form and hold metal. I have 3/4" self drilling screws to hold panels in place until fastened, and they are reused quite a few times.

The countersunk rivets I buy locally in a box of 500. Eastwood has the same thing http://www.eastwood.com/rivets-steel-co ... x-500.html . I use the double ended drill bit I buy locally for $5 to drill the 1/8" hole and counter sink in one operation. http://www.toolsource.com/countersink-d ... 66232.html is one similar to what I use. The dimpling vice grip pliers might be handy, but not for the amount of rivets I use. The hand riveter by Marson is the tool of choice, but I have tried a air riveter a friend had.

A air compressor is a necessity, for all air tools and the paint gun. I started with a homebuilt one that was the compressor from a 46 school bus and driven by a 1/2 hp garage door reversible motor, which sat on a horizontal 60 gallon water tank. I have an extra 60 gallon tank for volume. I stepped up to a 6 hp 60 gallon compressor in 97 and still use the same extra tank for volume. The rods failed on that compressor this year, so I am using my Dad's compressor now, that is a 5 hp 60 gallon. Those are single stage. I will eventually step up to a 2 stage.

That is most of what I use now. I started with a body hammer and dolly, the jitterbug and inline sander, the old homebuilt compressor, the electric sheetmetal shear, and the assortment of hand tools. The collection of tools grew as I started doing more of my own work.

Terry L. Rahn

_________________
61 Fordor Deluxe Wagon RIP 69-95
61 2 Dr Wagon
61 Futura 76-17 RIP
http://members.fotki.com/tlr41552/about/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:29 pm 
Offline
O5-16
O5-16
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 9:09 pm
Posts: 1356
Location: Green Bay WI
David Conwill wrote:

Unfortunately, every time I start to look into doing the repairs myself, most of the feedback I get points me back at professionals. It's not something I see myself doing much of; I don't have room to build a fleet. Plus, everyone says not to tackle your car until you've had plenty of practice on scrap materials - my neighbors and wife would go crazy if I started hauling home junk to practice bodywork on.


Dave

It depends on your level of natural mechanical ability and how much you want to do. If you have a reasonable amount of skills you can do it yourself. There is very little you can do to your car that can't be fixed if it doesn't turn out to your satisfaction. How will you know if you can do something if you don't try it? Tell the "Doubting Thomases" and "Debbie Downers" to shut up. Tactfully of course! As for bringing home junk - it's not junk if you learn a skill you didn't have before. I've bought quit a few things over the years as projects to experiment on. My wife figures it keeps me out of the bars so she doesn't say much.:) Some turned out well some not so much. I didn't spend a lot on any of the things I bought so wasn't out a lot if they didn't turn out. You don't have to bring home a whole car just a fender. They are light enough to handle easily, don't take up much space and you can get at both sides easily. You might even be able to get one free from a salvage yard if you can take it off yourself.

Ken

_________________
Ken

If I can't fix it it's junk - throw it away.
I don't take any s@#* from machines!
The day you stop learning is the day you start getting left behind.
Sometimes you just have to pay for cool.
Nothing is fool proof because fools are so ingenious.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:26 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
It seems we’ve killed both “What did you do to your Falcon today?” threads ( :( ), so I’ll go back to posting ‘61 updates here - even though it’s not really an active project anymore since the ‘62 came on the scene.

I’m halfway through replacing the throwout bearing in the ‘61 in preparation for attending the yearly cruise in my hometown. The new bearing is installed, but I had to quit last night before I got the transmission in place. I was having trouble getting everything to line up. If I recall from when I did the four-speed swap on my Camaro, it may help to have my lovely assistant step on the clutch pedal while I slide the transmission in place.

I still haven’t figured out the tach issue. I note that the light doesn’t come on with the rest of the instrument panel lights, so I’m still thinking either I have a bad ground or a bad connection. I found the receipt, too, in case it’s a bad tach.

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 6:47 am 
Offline
O3-12
O3-12
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:54 am
Posts: 1058
Location: Bennington, VT 05201
No progress on the throwout bearing last night. I took the evening off and started reading a book. I'm on a deadline, but I was just too sore and burned out to climb back under the car.

Here's hoping I'm feeling more energetic this evening. The car has to be ready by Thursday!

_________________
1962 Deluxe - 250/5-speed


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 135 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group